History

Lovelock Depot

The Central Pacific Railroad Depot in Lovelock, Nevada was built in 1880 in the stick style or Eastlake style, functioning as the principal point of access to the town in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The building was originally located on the northeast corner of West Broadway Avenue and Main Street, but was moved by the town in 1999 to its present site across Broadway Avenue. The Lovelock Depot is the last known of the “Depot #2 design”, and only example of its type in Nevada, to have survived. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. Today the Lovelock Depot is home to the Pershing County Chamber of Commerce/Visitors Center and the Frontier Community Coalition.

Pershing County Courthouse

Pershing County was carved out of Humboldt County's southern region after arguments over public funds necessitated a division of the territory. The state legislature created Nevada's seventeenth county in 1919 and designated Lovelock as the county seat. The county was named after General John J. "Blackjack" Pershing. A long standing rivalry with Humboldt County inspired Pershing County commissioners to build a monumental courthouse that would surpass any government symbol their northern neighbor could erect. In 1920, officials hired Frederick J. DeLongchamps, an esteemed architect responsible for several Nevada courthouse designs. They selected Howard S. Williams of San Francisco for the construction, and Jacob C. Meyer of Reno to supply the heating and plumbing. Finished on June 20, 1921, the 16,000 square foot, single-story structure cost $99,138.68. It occupies two acres of land at the end of Lovelock's central commercial district. The circle-hexagon contour of the building takes its inspiration from Thomas Jefferson's library at the University of Virginia, itself referring to the Roman Pantheon. Designed in a popular neoclassical style, its shape is unique among the nation's historic county courthouses. Six Ionic columns in terra cotta support a full pedimented portico over the entrance. The interior contains an unusual layout of a central circular courtroom surrounded by offices for county officials and employees. A cartouche with ornamental pilasters on either side decorates the wall behind the judge's bench. In 1947, the county contacted DeLongchamps for design of an additional wing to the courthouse, but officials did not pursue construction. The courthouse remains in its original design.

Marzen House Museum

The Marzen House Museum is dedicated to preserving relics and artifacts pertaining to the rich history of Pershing County. The best part? The history doesn't stop with the fascinating mementos inside, as the building itself is a bonafide slice of Silver State history. Originally constructed in 1875 as the showplace home of a wealthy local rancher by the name of Colonel Joseph Marzen, visitors can enjoy the fully restored building and be pleasantly surprised with the wonderful array of artifacts from Lovelock’s early days. The home was originally erected on the Big Meadows Ranch, located just 1.5 miles south of it’s present location. The Marzen House museum features antique mining equipment, including several large-scale pieces that can be found on the museum grounds, vintage home fixtures and other antiquities from pioneer homes, relics and artifacts dating back to the region’s earliest Native American inhabitants, and a display dedicated to the Immigrant Trail. The Museum also features a selection of personal items from the town’s most famous person, former Lovelock resident Edna Purviance. This silent-movie actress appeared in many early movies alongside the famed Charlie Chaplin. One of the museum’s most interesting displays is a representation of the American Indian cave locally known as Lovelock Cave. Also, the Marzen House Museum the starting point and resource for information when traveling the Lovelock Cave Backcountry Byway to the actual cave.

Lovers Lock Plaza

Couples, friends and family are invited to the Pershing County Courthouse Park to symbolically anchor their love by adding a lock to a chain and throwing away the key. The tradition is adopted from an ancient Chinese custom that has caught on in other historical sites around the world.

Thunder Mountain Monument

Frank Van Zant had always been interested in Native American history and artifacts; gradually, that interest had become an obsession. He believed himself to be a quarter Creek Indian and took on a new name, Chief Rolling Thunder Mountain. When he arrived in Imlay, he began covering his trailer with concrete mixed with stones he’d dragged down from the mountains. Although he’d never done any sort of art before, Thunder turned out to be a whiz at sculpting wet concrete. Though visitors can’t enter the one remaining building (a large, two-story home constructed from white-wash concrete sculpture and “white man’s trash”) there is much to see in the remains of the hostel, playground, exterior walls, etc., including a vast array of discarded items that have become part of site. Information panels written by Van Zant’s son describe life in the hostel and explain the project as an homage to the genocide of the Native Americans.

Unionville

Now in Pershing County, Unionville was the original county seat for Humboldt County, serving in that capacity from its founding in July 1861 until the seat was relocated to Winnemucca in 1873. The big mining boom at Unionville occurred between 1863 and 1870. During that time, the population was reported to be as high as 1,500 persons. Mark Twain arrived in Unionville with the intention of prospecting for silver in 1862, describing the town as consisting of "eleven cabins and a liberty-pole". As is common in most mining communities, after the boom, the town experienced a decline soon afterwards. By 1870, it was discovered that there was little rich ore in the district. The decline was speeded by the completion of the Central Pacific Railroad through the Humboldt valley, and the establishment of Winnemucca as a major trading and shipping center.

Lovelock Depot

1005 W. Broadway

The Central Pacific Railroad Depot in Lovelock, Nevada was built in 1880 in the stick style or Eastlake style, functioning as the principal point of access to the town in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The building was originally located on the northeast corner of West Broadway Avenue and Main Street, but was moved by the town in 1999 to its present site across Broadway Avenue. The Lovelock Depot is the last known of the “Depot #2 design”, and only example of its type in Nevada, to have survived. It was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. Today the Lovelock Depot is home to the Pershing County Chamber of Commerce/Visitors Center and the Frontier Community Coalition.

Pershing County Courthouse

400 Main Street

Pershing County was carved out of Humboldt County's southern region after arguments over public funds necessitated a division of the territory. The state legislature created Nevada's seventeenth county in 1919 and designated Lovelock as the county seat. The county was named after General John J. "Blackjack" Pershing. A long standing rivalry with Humboldt County inspired Pershing County commissioners to build a monumental courthouse that would surpass any government symbol their northern neighbor could erect. In 1920, officials hired Frederick J. DeLongchamps, an esteemed architect responsible for several Nevada courthouse designs. They selected Howard S. Williams of San Francisco for the construction, and Jacob C. Meyer of Reno to supply the heating and plumbing. Finished on June 20, 1921, the 16,000 square foot, single-story structure cost $99,138.68. It occupies two acres of land at the end of Lovelock's central commercial district. The circle-hexagon contour of the building takes its inspiration from Thomas Jefferson's library at the University of Virginia, itself referring to the Roman Pantheon. Designed in a popular neoclassical style, its shape is unique among the nation's historic county courthouses. Six Ionic columns in terra cotta support a full pedimented portico over the entrance. The interior contains an unusual layout of a central circular courtroom surrounded by offices for county officials and employees. A cartouche with ornamental pilasters on either side decorates the wall behind the judge's bench. In 1947, the county contacted DeLongchamps for design of an additional wing to the courthouse, but officials did not pursue construction. The courthouse remains in its original design.

Marzen House Museum

25 Marzen Lane

The Marzen House Museum is dedicated to preserving relics and artifacts pertaining to the rich history of Pershing County. The best part? The history doesn't stop with the fascinating mementos inside, as the building itself is a bonafide slice of Silver State history. Originally constructed in 1875 as the showplace home of a wealthy local rancher by the name of Colonel Joseph Marzen, visitors can enjoy the fully restored building and be pleasantly surprised with the wonderful array of artifacts from Lovelock’s early days. The home was originally erected on the Big Meadows Ranch, located just 1.5 miles south of it’s present location. The Marzen House museum features antique mining equipment, including several large-scale pieces that can be found on the museum grounds, vintage home fixtures and other antiquities from pioneer homes, relics and artifacts dating back to the region’s earliest Native American inhabitants, and a display dedicated to the Immigrant Trail. The Museum also features a selection of personal items from the town’s most famous person, former Lovelock resident Edna Purviance. This silent-movie actress appeared in many early movies alongside the famed Charlie Chaplin. One of the museum’s most interesting displays is a representation of the American Indian cave locally known as Lovelock Cave. Also, the Marzen House Museum the starting point and resource for information when traveling the Lovelock Cave Backcountry Byway to the actual cave.

Lovers Lock Plaza

400 Main St.

Couples, friends and family are invited to the Pershing County Courthouse Park to symbolically anchor their love by adding a lock to a chain and throwing away the key. The tradition is adopted from an ancient Chinese custom that has caught on in other historical sites around the world.

Thunder Mountain Monument

Imlay Exit, East side of Interstate 80

Frank Van Zant had always been interested in Native American history and artifacts; gradually, that interest had become an obsession. He believed himself to be a quarter Creek Indian and took on a new name, Chief Rolling Thunder Mountain. When he arrived in Imlay, he began covering his trailer with concrete mixed with stones he’d dragged down from the mountains. Although he’d never done any sort of art before, Thunder turned out to be a whiz at sculpting wet concrete. Though visitors can’t enter the one remaining building (a large, two-story home constructed from white-wash concrete sculpture and “white man’s trash”) there is much to see in the remains of the hostel, playground, exterior walls, etc., including a vast array of discarded items that have become part of site. Information panels written by Van Zant’s son describe life in the hostel and explain the project as an homage to the genocide of the Native Americans.

Unionville

Located south of I-80 and just east of State Route 400 on Unionville Road.

Now in Pershing County, Unionville was the original county seat for Humboldt County, serving in that capacity from its founding in July 1861 until the seat was relocated to Winnemucca in 1873. The big mining boom at Unionville occurred between 1863 and 1870. During that time, the population was reported to be as high as 1,500 persons. Mark Twain arrived in Unionville with the intention of prospecting for silver in 1862, describing the town as consisting of "eleven cabins and a liberty-pole". As is common in most mining communities, after the boom, the town experienced a decline soon afterwards. By 1870, it was discovered that there was little rich ore in the district. The decline was speeded by the completion of the Central Pacific Railroad through the Humboldt valley, and the establishment of Winnemucca as a major trading and shipping center.

Local Government

Pershing County Strategic Plan

Pershing County Economic Development Strategic Plan is being developed now and will be released in the summer/fall of 2017. Please check back here for updates, minutes, agendas and other information.

Vision Statement

Western Nevada Development District, which Pershing County is a member of, is an innovative, regional economy, rooted in sustainable development and enriched by the area’s abundant natural resources and the collaboration of its independent unique communities. Region-wide these prosperous communities demonstrate a forward-moving commitment to quality of life and to opportunity for all residents.

County Meetings

Info About County Meetings

Pershing County Commissioners meet in the Round Room of the Courthouse every 1st and 3rd Wednesday of the month, beginning at 8:30 a.m.

Commissioner Carol Shank
Commissioner Larry Rackley
Commissioner Robert McDougall
Karen Wesner, Administrative Assistant

P.O. Box Drawer E
400 Main Street
Lovelock, NV 89419
(775) 273-2342
kwesner@pershingcounty.net

The Lovelock City Council

The Lovelock City Council meet the 1st and 3rd Tuesday of the month at Lovelock City Hall, 7:00 p.m.

Mayor Mike Giles
Councilman Dan Murphy
Councilman Tom Donaldson
Councilwoman Pat Rowe
Lisa Booth, City Clerk

P.O. Box 238
400 14th Street
Lovelock, NV 89419
(775) 273-2356
lbooth@cityoflovelock.com

The Pershing County Regional Planning Commission

The Pershing County Regional Planning Commission meets on the first Wednesday of the month at Lovelock City Hall, 7:00 p.m.

James Evans, Planning and Building Director

P.O. Box
Lovelock, NV 89419
(775) 273-2700
jevans@pershingcounty.net

Pershing County Economic Development Authority

The Pershing County Economic Development Authority meets the first Monday of the month at the Pershing County Community Center, beginning at 2:00 p.m.

Heidi E. Lusby-Angvick, PCED
Executive Director

P.O. Box 1044
Lovelock, NV 89419
(775) 273-4909
pceda.hlusby@gmail.com

Meeting Dates

Frontier Community Coalition meetings every 3rd Monday of the month, 10 a.m., at the Pershing County Community Center

Pershing County Solid Waste Management and Recycling Board meetings the second Monday of the month, 5:15 p.m., at the Pershing County Community Center

Pershing County School District meetings the 3rd Monday of the month, 5 p.m., at the Pershing County School District Office

Minutes/Agenda Uploads

Pershing County Economic Development Authority Minutes and Agendas

Moving Here

Moving Here

Pershing County is a wonderful place to live. The hustle and bustle of city life do not occur here. Our residents drive with one hand on the wheel and the other waving hello to their neighbors. A handshake and your word still mean something here. The Pershing County Schools and our children are the pride of our community.